Why does the brain need to listen to the body?

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We will see what are the neural mechanisms of the interpretation of the body and how we can improve our communication with the body to better integrate emotions.

When we think about the information that the brain processes normally We think that we have only 5 Senses What are they then the exteroceptive senses That is to say those that come from sight, smell Of taste, touch and hearing Well actually it is said that we have 7 Senses And in the exteroceptive ones, that is to say the ones coming from the Senses of not only priority receptors The priority sense that has our brain is the interoception That is the information that the brain receives from inside the body

The signals sent to it by the intestine stomach The heart the Breathing all that It's an information What our brain processes constantly and that's the priority sense The second sense that our brain has is the proprioception

Some people consider it part of interoception

people that researchers What do they think proprioception is a Sense apart And the proprioception is the sense that gives an account of how you are our body That is if I am crouched down, if I am Straight how are my shoulders how are my arms How is it My structure my skeleton how is our body architecture And that information Many times it has been thought that well the brain knows How is our body but it is already is a passive information the brain needs to know what posture we are in But nowadays what Is being seen It is that the information About the position It is key for our brain, i

e

That our brain interprets How is our body and that information that our body carries them It interprets it uses it For Then take different decisions that is to say What is binding information For example proprioception It is so important It is said to have been discovered recently What is one of the Senses that people with Alzheimer's disease never lose

That is to say His brain still knows how his body is This has given rise to the consideration of many techniques based on body movement To try to reduce the deficits cognitive deficits associated with diseases neurodegenerative there was a study that was published in the year 2003 in one of the journals most prestigious medical research journals that there are And he concluded that dancing was one of the great protectors of the brain Our brain when we are dancing Because it is performing a task of extreme complexity Why We are coordinating space and time at the same time We are coordinating the rhythms But above all We are coordinating Our own body Thus with the dance our brain becomes It gets used to perceive better In which way is the body what is the posture what aesthetics has the posture The whole neuroscience of dance is a world of its own

Very interesting because it has given rise to results as promising as this one Let the dance be one of the great protectors Of Alzheimer's disease What is this based on, what is the neuroscience behind proprioception? How does our brain know how our body is at every moment In our brain we have some cortexes Which are called the cortexes Somatosensory Which are something like if we We could put on a headband

This headband that we sometimes wear to tie back our hair Well, more or less like this in that part We have these crusts Somatosensory Which are also motor Primary that where our whole body is represented Here we are going to see now I'm going to tell you how the body is represented in the brain but the important thing and the most important message of these crusts somatosensory It's that it's not only the brain part What's in charge that's involved in knowing how my body's doing What information I receive from my hands from the face of the Back of the feet How is my whole body which is what Is going on But these same crusts Are the ones that our brain uses to make associations They are also the barks somatosensory cortexes have a role Related to the cortexes Associative and what does this mean Well, every single thing that we see it means that we We a scene We are visualizing is always very Complex then we don't just see what's going on but we interpret We don't see things as they are but How we are Said the Babylonian Talmud and what does this mean when we are watching a scene We are interpreting I am seeing One person who is speaking, one person What the other is doing or what the other is doing I'm associating, I'm remembering, I'm locating everything

In space and time My brain is trying to make everything concorde that there is nothing to be dissenting Let there be no inconsistency We are constantly making associations Of everything that is to say we are generating What is called a internal representation Of our world And that's where the somatosensory cortexes also come in

That is to say The same parts of our Brain Which are in charge of the coordination Of knowing where how our body is also the parts are Of the brain that we use to interpret And if we look at this kind of headband Which occupies what is the cortex somatosensory Well it was discovered and this was the year 1952 It was discovered that our body was represented in a somewhat amorphous manner In our brain it is not represented as we are, first the head, then the back up to the feet

They are separated in the different components But above all what was very striking Is that not all the parts of the body Are of equal importance For our brain If we were to look and you can see Here is a representation of the Brain in our body in the brain we see that the most important parts for our brain are above all the hands The hands are the parts of our body to which the brain devotes most of its time Neural resources It has to be said that this representation of the body is common to all cultures but evidently There are cultures in the which is a little bit more represented than in another The representation the amount of neural resources What our brain devotes to our hands for example is much higher In the Italians than in the Germans Not as we all can Imagine The hands and especially the big fingers They have a lot of representation in our brain This has led to To results not within the world of research that have been very curious that is to observe The sensations that our brain produces when we caress them our own hands This is one of the Sensations that have been seen that can be more pleasant

For our brain Notice that many times people when they become nervous that they have to do Speak in public or something that stresses them out It does a lot like this Because it is a reassuring sensation that is, we are massaging ourselves touching our hands It is something that makes us A lot a lot feeling of well-being a lot feeling of calm Why Because we are stimulating A lot of part of our brain that occupies So a large part of the Barks somatosensory if right now you You touch your hand and touch your big toe Well, you will illuminate here a great part of your brain Pa, pa, pa Whose neurons Would be firing Electrical discharges Electrical discharges Whose hemodynamic component has an electrical component

of calm of sense of well-being then the hands are very important For our brain There's a study that's being done at the University of California that tries to see the relevance of the mudras

The postures that are put in Yoga Coming from the medicine therefore hindu To see what awakens in our brain the different Postures Hand-holding one of the first preliminary results It is that they have determined is that certain positions Of the mudras produce the liberation of the neuro Transmitter of the Serotonin What is the neuro transmitter more involved Laser clinic in the feeling of well-being But another of the results indicate us That certain mudras could favor the processes of attention This then I guess It will turn out to be very close to people from the world of yoga then the hands for us For our brain they are very important there are many Many neurons many, many more neurons Dedicated to processing of the hands than to the whole back for example The next part of Of our body that is more represented is the face If you see in the representation that Of our body In the brain Well, we are practically Expensive hands and some of the Cervical but most of all we are like a face like this with pouts The most important part For our para Our face brain is the mouth and here I am going to tell you about one of the Studies that seems to me to be more binding that is having a lot of impact in the world of the psychology What is smile Some techniques are being developed that I find very interesting, for example What is treating anxiety and stress chronic Through pacification techniques of the face That is to say How to change The posture of our face It changes The activity of our neurons The smile is one of the most important processes happiness sensation we feel when we It provokes, there is a very nice study Which shows that just by smiling for the sake of smiling even if we don't have No reason to be laughing but just Performing the gesture of the Smile The activity of our amygdala is reduced the amygdala It's that part of Our emotional brain that even though it's very tiny has a great capacity of developing more anxious states more stressful more fearful more aggressive Reduce our amygdala control The activity of our amygdala is also one of the processes of wellbeing Just by the fact of smiling even if one has no reason to smile There is an inhibition of the amygdalae note the importance That it has The smile Smiles also one of the Most contagious phenomena What has been seen When we're playing a person when we're seeing a person when we're watching a Person There is a particular part of the brain which is in charge only of the face processing At this moment that part of our brain is literally replaying the face that it is seeing When we see a face that is smiling it's producing Unconsciously a smile or neuronically it's producing a smile inside of us to control, to pacify All that is the gesture More orofacial It is very beneficial for the well-being The studies that this one is more in charge of the stremography What is to say the electrical component of our muscles They saw that most of the time the People are under stress Muscular even if we are doing any task we tend to tend to To have tension in this part One of the things that has been seen not and That we are trying to promote Is to give more Account From the sensations of Our body every few minutes throughout the day to give an account of how I am How is my body Specifically How is our face how is the orofacial gesture, pacify the gesture and if we already put a little smile even if it is slight our brain It appreciates it a lot Another important part of Our body for the brain It is the part that is most related to the eyes

The eyes since 2 years ago have passed to the neuroscience world they were the great forgotten ones It was not thought to have any impact on brain activity

nowadays it has been seen that the movement of the eyes is key For our Brain That every time we literally blink our eyes we go into an unconscious state And we blink very frequently About 10 years ago it was Discovered that we blink a lot more times than we need to Our eye to be moist So we did not blink for To keep the eyeball moist We blink many more times We can see that in our day to day life for example when We are told to pay attention to something and we open our eyes To pay attention In the studies of the neuroscience of meditation it has been seen that meditators tend to blink much less and that's why those of us who are dedicated to neuroimaging are very grateful because Every time that we put a person into a machine every time the machine blinks, we get decalibrate Then a person who blinks little Well, he is an absolutely desirable subject In an experiment of neuroscience and what was seen what was seen there by doing these experiments Is that Very experienced meditators blink their eyes much less and that decrease in the number of flickerings It is related to its attentional mechanisms Nowadays it is Study the movement Of the eyes and the number of times that we blink As a sign of Cognitive impairment as a sign of Mechanisms of attention we are more attentive we also have greater capacity of attention when we know how to fix our gaze and so practically One year and one study that has been released this week Last Relating the movement of the eyes to the heart These are absolutely revolutionary studies for the neuroscience world

But it has been seen that this movement that we involuntarily perform with Our eyes can be coordinated by the cardiac activity

and something that is very interesting It tells us that when we talk to someone and we look into their eyes that person we may be able to unconsciously sense that person's heart rate Notice how what we neuroscience is telling us today It's that when we talk to a person what they're going through It's two bodies that are communicating with each other we are perceiving each other's body we are interpreting each other's body Not only the word So we have said that we are very careful in the mouth we have very Care in the eyes And a part that is very important For emotional management is the space between the eyebrows Notice that in the Clinical analysis and neurological evaluations Psychological That are made of a person Who has had damage Brain Traumatic brain injury or stroke or who has come out of coma It is to see the capacity of the reaction between his eyebrows

By showing them scenes that are unpleasant That capacity that reflex of closing the eyebrows is a sign of what the Emotional systems They have not been very deteriorated then there were studies here and they did a study that was very curious and very striking

A few years ago and it was showing that people who had had botox between the eyebrows which is a kind of a painkiller that prevents muscle contraction

Well that study that happens with people What has more paralyzed that part of the brain for reasons Aesthetics So what What he discovered Is that these people had a decrease in their amygdala activity

That is to say that the negative They lived it with less intensity than the People who had botoxed us but still interpreted the positive in the same way

that study which at the beginning was not thought to be the other way around was very much talked about

Not of what role because it had the botox was not in a sense quite comfortable But the interpretation The important thing Is that the reflection that came out of all those Studies It is that we interpret the world through the face What we need to live the negative moments and we need Living the moments Positives equally but we need from the body To make sense of such abstract notions as joy or sadness We need our hands We've seen what's more represented we need our face, the eyes are indispensable The paper the influence it has Smile and a pacified gesture A long time ago In our brain always under the hypothesis that our brain It's going to interpret how our body is and it uses it As feedback to know how it is or not in other words If we put a gesture Of bitterness of sadness a shrunken gesture a tense gesture In our face Our brain interprets that Structure facial as A sign of discomfort And therefore activates all the Mechanisms of discomfort There are many studies that have not shown that regardless of having reasons or not Putting a position Facial or other leads to those Moods That is to say Our brain will always interpret How our face is there to make us unwrap Well, all the neural mechanisms whether we are right or wrong Another important part of our body for the brain is above all this part Of the back the cervical as we We sit Shrunk, we'll see about that After but mostly Mostly what we do when we are watching To another person is to constantly interpret their body one of the fields that has not been more Studied for example in the world of neuromarketing or in the world of From neuroscience applied to leadership or to the Group management Well, it's knowing how to interpret the signals in someone else's body

there is a lot of literature, especially in the world of the Psychology of trying to see how a person has become nervous yes

you're convincing him if he's getting tired, if he's getting bored, what to interpret How he's doing, what he's doing, how the other person is feeling through his body

Well there are some studies that seem to me to be important

and they tell us that the best way of interpreting the body of the other is to learn to interpret your own body How to know your own body how is learning to listen to the sensations of your body, how to learn to realize Throughout the day constantly how our body is doing It makes our brain consciously therefore more aware of the Sensations of the form of the structure, of the posture That has taken our body Now to stop, to finish so that we can see the importance What has the body in our brain It has to be said that one of the parts of the brain that is more dedicated to The management of who I am How I recognize myself as I observe myself is the insula the insula is that part Which is the one that activates when I'm observing myself That part of the brain is also in charge of processing the posture of my body

And the position that my body has in space, I know how much space is surrounding me

I am aware of my body in volume So this was leading to an interpretation that seemed to me to be That it was very beautiful and that is to associate the body posture with the posture

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